Lunchtime Links: Barclays Capital hiring even more people than initially thought

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Barclays Capital is well and truly hiring. According to the Financial Times today, it has ingested 450 people into its Asian and European cash equities business since Autumn and fully intends to hire another 300 people by the end of the year. News of the expanding expansion follows a report in the Independent earlier this week which quoted Bob Diamond as saying that the bank had hired 140 people in Europe since September and that it intends to hire another 100. If so, Asia looks set to be the beneficiary of most of the new hires.

Lazard hires two managing directors for mid-market investment banking (Financial News)

Restructuring hiring rush continues apace. (Wall Street Journal)

Ex- BNP and Ospraie commodity traders start a hedge fund. (Bloomberg)

Merrill's head of M&A is leaving. (Financial Times)

Member of Deutsche's management board joins FT Deutschland. (Bloomberg)

Let's take a quick look at where the best of Wall Street will flee to...(Brendan Coffey)

"We don't believe it is tenable to opt out because doing so would leave you vulnerable and exposed." (Reuters)

Citigroup chair Dick Parsons says the Obama administration doesn't want to run the bank. Instead, the government just wants to tell Citi how to pay its staff.

(The Deal)

US government doesn't want to cap pay, it just wants to regulate it. (CNBC)

Geithner to rein in derivatives. (CNN)

The rich get richer on Wall Street. (CNN)

"It's a sham. The banks are insolvent. The US government is trying to sedate the public because they are down to the last $100bn (66bn) of the $700bn TARP funds." (Telegraph)

"This is Credit Agricole going through the credit-crisis cycle and still suffering from the financial crisis. Profitability is falling in all businesses." (Bloomberg)

BofE says banks may need more state aid. (Telegraph)

"I am very optimistic about the world in, let's say, 2030; it's the next ten years or so that have me worried." (Bloomberg)

Bilderberg is divided on whether to put into motion, "Either a prolonged, agonizing depression that dooms the world to decades of stagnation, decline and poverty ... or an intense-but-shorter depression that paves the way for a new sustainable economic world order, with less sovereignty but more efficiency." (Pension Pulse)

S&P: Banking crisis could go on for another 3-4 years. (Clusterstock)

"I have guys coming in here saying, 'I don't want to look like a banker anymore.' (NY Times)

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