Meet the banking MD with the most enormous number of side-projects  

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What's life like when you're a seasoned investment banker with a 27 year banking career behind you? Try asking Ed Matthews, a former Nomura and Lehman Brothers managing director with a lot of other things going on.

Matthews just joined Jefferies as a managing director in UK investment banking after a year in corporate broking at Shore Capital. Jefferies may not be his only source of income: alongside his banking job and salary, Matthews' LinkedIn profile indicates his involvement with 16 different companies, many of which he has invested in.

Matthews' investments include everything from lovecrafts.com (an online marketplace for makers) to Pots&Co (award wining desserts), Tyresonthedrive,com (fitting tyres while you wait) and Camberley Health Golf Club. He's also a member of the advisory panel for Bink, an app which links payment cards to loyalty programs.

It's not unusual for senior bankers to invest in side-projects (think Alasdair Warren at Deutsche Bank and his interest in a West Country art deco cinema). Matthews, however, seems to have taken the process a step further than usual. Alongside his investments, he has a long career in finance that began when he joined PricewaterhouseCoopers as an audit manager in 1990. He moved to Credit Suisse as an executive director three years later. In 2002, he joined Citi Group as the executive director of corporate broking and shifted to Lehman Brothers as an MD three years later. In September 2008, when Lehman Brothers collapsed, Matthews joined Nomura as the head of European retail investment banking and remained there till May 2016...

It's informative that despite his many side projects and investments, Matthews continues to work in investment banking. Either side-projects aren't that lucrative, or working in banking is a lot of fun.

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