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How much analysts in large banks earn before and after tax, all over the world, according to UBS

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As part of its 2012 report on purchasing power around the globe, UBS has had a look at the amount you can earn as an analyst in a bank everywhere from Amsterdam and Athens to Brussels, Dubai, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, London, Milan, Paris, Tel Aviv and elsewhere. It also looks at the average number of hours worked by financial analysts in each of the cities.

UBS says its pay figures are for someone who’s:

Employed at a major bank with completed studies (university, technical institute, possibly also an institute of higher technical education) and at least 5 years of work experience; about 30 to 35 years old, single.

Here we have the table, titled ‘Income and working hours of financial analysts,’  in its entirety:

Source: UBS

The keen-eyed among you may notice some anomalies. Most notably, UBS thinks 30-35 year old financial analysts working for major banks in London earn $64.2k gross (£39k) and only work 40 hours a week. This is despite a recent pay survey from Dartmouth Partners which found that total average compensation in for first year M&A analysts in London was anything from £57k to £74k and that UBS itself was paying £66k.

UBS thinks analysts in Seoul earn 2.5 times more than analysts in London, despite only working three hours more per week. On the other hand, you would not want to work in Manila, where it thinks you’ll earn 6 times less than in London for the equivalent effort.

We would suggest that when it comes to London at least, UBS’s figures are wrong. Either that, or it knows something we don’t.

Also interestingly, and possibly more reliably, it suggests that if you want a lot of holiday you should be working in Copehagen, Paris, Madrid – and avoiding New York and Mexico City.

Source: UBS

Comments (4)

Comments
  1. Sarah Butcher does it again…

    “The keen-eyed among you may notice some anomalies. Most notably, UBS thinks 30-35 year old financial analysts working for major banks in London earn $64.2k gross (£39k) and only work 40 hours a week. This is despite a recent pay survey from Dartmouth Partners which found that total average compensation in for first year M&A analysts in London was anything from £57k to £74k and that UBS itself was paying £66k.”

    What a conundrum! Oh wait…

    “UBS says its pay figures are for someone who’s:

    “Employed at a major bank with completed studies (university, technical institute, possibly also an institute of higher technical education) and at least 5 years of work experience; about 30 to 35 years old, single.””

    This does not specify division. Is it so implausible that a M&A analyst might make close-to-or-more than someone who fits that description in another business area?

    No. Case closed.

  2. @FWhite – as far as I was concerned, I was flagging that there was a distinction between UBS’s ‘financial analyst’ and Dartmouth Partners’ M&aA analyst by referring to them specifically as different types of analyst in the text.

    A’financial analyst’ in an investment bank could be anything – including an M&A analyst. The UBS figures still seem suspect – who, after 5 years, working in a large bank in London would be on a package of £39k? Graduate starting salaries, even in operations, are around and above that level.

    SarahtheEditor Reply
     
  3. You’d have to be a muppet to work at that level in London for £39k. Even at UBS. No maybe not. I’d pay that much NOT to work at UBS.

  4. “A’financial analyst’ in an investment bank could be anything – including an M&A analyst. The UBS figures still seem suspect – who, after 5 years, working in a large bank in London would be on a package of £39k? Graduate starting salaries, even in operations, are around and above that level.”

    Yes, a financial analyst as defined by UBS could be anything. But including an M&A analyst? Probably not. How many 30-35 year old M&A analysts are there? Few-none I’d wager. In IBD the analyst title is for graduates, 20-25 sort of age range.

    Analysts in that age range are probably middle/back office roles. Thus, lower salary.

    Just because they call it a ‘financial analyst’, that doesn’t make the job front-office. They could be doing anything from internal finance to risk or compliance.

    Furthermore, no M&A analyst works 40 hrs/wk.

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