How to talk if you want to work for Revolut

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Revolut culture

Things have not been going well for fintech firm Revolut. The past month has brought allegations of money laundering and links to the Russian government, the resignation of the CFO, fresh claims of a toxic culture for its employees, and scrutiny by the UK watchdog.

Nonetheless, Revolut is hiring! The digital bank, which is worth around $1.7bn, according to its most recent fundraising round, is at this very moment looking for around 240 people globally, including 134 in London, eight in New York, and three in Singapore. In London alone, ten of its positions are for 'heads of' (eg. head of digital marketing, head of corporate development, head of banking, head of accounting). Yesterday, CFO and ex-Credit Suisse trader Nik Storonsky let it be known that Revolut is also looking for a 'Head of People & Culture to help take us to new heights' (its previous head of people only lasted six months in the job before leaving). Presumably, it wants a new CFO too.  

Assuming you want a job at Revolut, what does it take to get hired there? Back in December, Alan Chang and Christos Chelmis, Revolut's operations VP and 'product owner,' told us the company received 1,000 applications every week, that 99.5% of those applicants were rejected, and that only "super-super high calibre people" made it through the recruitment process.

What recruitment process? If you're going to be one of the five people in every thousand that enters Revolut's realm of 13-hour days and Sunday evening achievement calls, Chang and Christos said you'll need to complete a 'home task' first. If this goes well, there will be an interview. And if you make it to interview, you're going to need to show you fit.

Chang and Christos didn't elaborate on what it takes to fit in at Revolut, but if you're going for a job there, it will help if you understand one important thing. - People at Revolut speak differently to everyone else. It's a different syntax, and it's a different vernacular. It will help if you talk like existing employees in your interview. It could be a good idea to write your CV in the same style.

1. It's ok to say shit a bit

Low level profanity is ok at Revolut. - Revolut itself says it's, "about getting shit done."  Maybe you could put this on your CV.

2.  Express yourself in two or three word catch-phrases 

Revolut is big on cultural taglines. Its three favourite ones are: 'Never Settle'; 'Stronger Together;' and 'Bring the A-Game.'

When applying for a job, you might therefore want to describe yourself as, 'A Natural Leader,' 'Always Aspiring,' or, 'Golden Child One.'

3. Lose yourself in a stream of consciousness with lots of single-word punchy sentences

This, really, is what will set you apart at Revolut. Both the company itself and its senior employees talk in the style of an aggressive motivational speaker with a short attention span.

Revolut describes its culture as follows:  'We are like special forces. We operate in small teams. We identify opportunities. We plan. We execute. We deliver. Fast. Precise. Inevitable. No corporate bullshit. No politics. No red tape. We get things done. We are on a mission. We change the world.'

Chang channels the same vibe on his LinkedIn Profile, where he says: "Incumbent Banks are powerful. They owe us nothing. They watch us. They punish us for our mistakes. They have more money, more people, more connections. We are underdogs. We keep learning. We innovate. Everyday is a new fight. Technology is our weapon. We identify opportunities. We focus. We execute. Banks can be beaten. We love the game."

Try for something similar in your interview: "I'm hungry. A hustler. I always push. Kill to win. Hit me up. Take me on. Try me out. I shoot high." Etc. etc.

Have a confidential story, tip, or comment you’d like to share? Contact: sbutcher@efinancialcareers.com in the first instance. Whatsapp/Signal/Telegram also available. Bear with us if you leave a comment at the bottom of this article: all our comments are moderated by human beings. Sometimes these humans might be asleep, or away from their desks, so it may take a while for your comment to appear. Eventually it will – unless it’s offensive or libelous (in which case it won’t.)

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