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Some public sector jobs pay quite well

We’ve pointed this out in the past, but with the banking jobs market in a very prolonged period of near total inactivity, it seems worth pointing out again – there are jobs in the public sector. And they pay.

A quick trawl of this and other websites reveals a whole host of six figure or near six figure opportunities which may come equipped with cast iron pensions and the possibility of leaving work at 6pm.

A small sample:

· A job working at the Tenant Services Authority, a new regulator for affordable housing. You will be ‘Assistant Director of Market Intelligence,’ and must have experience of ‘developing market reviews’ and ‘market mapping.’ Pay=up to 95k.

· A job working for Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs as a project manager on financial regulation. You must have a ‘proven track record in translating policy and business process requirements in to deliverable solution options, demonstrating very good attention to detail of all policy, process and technical design aspects whilst maintaining a strategic end to end perspective.’ Pay=500 a day.

· A job working for the Personal Accounts Delivery Authority as a ‘volumes analyst,’ in which you will be ‘Working closely with the design and implementation and funding teams to support their work through the provision of appropriate statistical information. Pay=unspecified, but they are asking for a first class degree in a numerate subject, which suggests they have high standards.

· A job working for the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform as director general, finance and operations. You will will oversee a budget of 1.4bn, and have, excellent financial and influencing skills and the ability to command respect within the department and across Whitehall. Pay=140k

We also asked public sector search consultants whether there’s really much enthusiasm for the CVs of former front office bankers. Neville Wilkinson at recruitment company Rockpools said there’s not much: “There’s often a degree of skepticism about why these people suddenly want to go into the public sector. At a high level, people are expected to really passionate about it.”

Katy Higgins at recruitment firm Veredus was altogether more positive. “Over the past few years there’s been a trend for government to look beyond the public sector for some jobs, like analysis roles,” she said, encouragingly.

Comments (23)

Comments
  1. What about bonus, Sarah? Do you really think this jobs are paid well?
    And the working environment? Do you think it is exciting?

    Those jobs are for dead wood, good if you aspire to retirement early and you don’t want commitment.

    Let’s be serious, the only “public sectors” we should talk here are few SWFs in some tax-free paradises….

    “In this country, you gotta make the money first. Then when you get the money, you get the power. Then when you get the power, then you get the women. ”

  2. I leave work before 6pm and got more than any of the above as a 2nd year analyst. Public sector pay is relatively horrific, and the environment is awful – full of lazy, inefficient people who are hard to fire.

  3. The banking sector is the new public sector so yes public sector Jobs do pay really well!! As that civil servant Henry just said he is lazy , inefficient , but he forgot : incompetent, and of sub-human intellegience.

  4. This website is obssessed with salaries / bonuses.

    If thats the only reason people go into this business no wonder we are where we are.

    Bonuses are down, we get it.

  5. Yes JGF, because EVERY SINGLE bank has now been bailed out by the state hasn’t it? Moron.

  6. public sector pay isnt great, but you get to leave on time, and get lots of holidays. Its a work life balance.

  7. Hahahaha – Henry is back.
    Brilliant….

  8. Henry you need to calm down…where do you work?

  9. Henry’s point 3 hours ago – is true. I have worked in public sector and it is full of people who want to do little work, not keen on change or learning anything new. This is usually due to the fact that the people who work there have been there for at least 20 years and do not know how else to work. When you want to fire some one you cant and if you do they always get a big payout. Its a very fusty environment.

  10. Civil servant Henry, do you think just because your bank wasn’t bailed out that it would actually exist, if the others hadn’t been. You are effectively public sector directly /indirectly, what ever . You are at the mercy of govts funding you , and your counterparties. You clearly don’t understand the industry you work in, which kind of explains the state of the now defunct financial services sector/global economy.To think that in theory after all the redundancies in the banking sector, the cream should remain…..hah laughable. You really are proving your sub-human intelligence….and it is really worrying for the future …

  11. The banks that haven’t been bailed out may be well run but are living on vapours. The bottom line is that we’re at the end of a decade long boom, the financial sector is bloated and many people, many who are good at their jobs, will just have to do something else because what they did before is no longer needed. Its not that CDO structurers aren’t smart, its just that I don’t need CDOs. Nothing personal.

  12. JGF, Laffer Curve – I’m an FX trader. Whatever happens, there’ll always be business here. Agree that some core parts of sales/trading are defunct, but stop branding everything with the same brush – for the MAJORITY of areas within banking we’re pretty much “business as usual” – a lot of places quieter but have removed a lot of dead weight so carrying on fine. I got a higher bonus this year than last, and will get a higher bonus next year than this.

  13. Henry – you spend far too much time on this site to be an FX trader…keep fetching the lunch and producing the p/l analysis and one day the world will truly be yours..

  14. Ms Sarah Butcher, you should add the fifth example: Civil servant Henry the FX Trader.

  15. The idea that 90k is not a lot amazes me. What would anyone need more than 50k per year to have good life is beyond me… and if you earn 50k or more you are in the top 10% of earners… plus bankers – you prove time after time that it’s very easy to gamble some one elses money

  16. Sonicred – you moron. Try buying a house in London on 50k (u might get 350k from a bank — ooh a nice 1bed flat in a rubbish part of town)

    Come back when you have a proper job

    Henry – good work son – now go and get my latte!

  17. I’m getting bored of reading the articles on this site. Even Henry does not amuse me as much anymore. Something needs to be done. HENRY GO GET MY COFFEE!

  18. Wait? After all his snooty comments Henry is a barrow boy FX TRADER??!?

  19. Henry your an FX Trader who can afford hours per day trawling this site?

    What are you trading french francs?!

  20. Chris is 1000% right: his website is obssessed with salaries / bonuses.
    I do my job because I am passionate about it. I was in academia before and did some good stuff but didn’t like the environment.

  21. Sorry Todd – we don’t write about bonuses and pay all the time. It’s just the time of year.

    Sarah, Editor, eFinancialCareers Reply
     
  22. Sarah: Good on you for pointing those positions out.

    Henry, I’m an Aussie IBer and stop past the .co.uk site to have a look here and there. Your name keeps popping up.

    If you ever work in Australia we will gladly knock you off your high-horse.

    Aussie Speedo’s Budgie Reply
     
  23. high salaries equal high house prices… lower salaries equal lower house prices… does that make me a moron…. why do you people think you should rewarded for your proven incompetence in the global finance markets

    There are three levels of housing market – in a house of your choice, in a house or no house… I own a house and earn less that 50k

    Had it not been for high earning bankers I might be able to think about moving sometime in the next 5 years.

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