☰ Menu eFinancialCareers

A fast, statistical guide to how 2013 panned out for investment bankers

It’s the first working day of 2014; time to bang your head repeatedly against your keyboard and, perhaps, reflect on the previous 12 months. While 2012 was universally bleak, last year was one of highs and lows for the industry. Here’s a breakdown of the key facts.

$72.6bn:

Global investment banking revenue in 2013, according to Dealogic. This is a 6% uplift on 2012, and the best year since 2007. DCM fees reached $21.3bn – an all-time high.

8.6%:

JPMorgan’s global share of the investment banking revenue wallet. This equates to $6.2bn, or $800m more than its nearest rival, Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

20,000:

The number of jobs investment banks need to cut in order to survive the new reality for the sector, according to Deutsche Bank analysts.

813:

The number of investment banking jobs offered to graduates in 2013. There were 110,000 applications, according the Association of Graduate Recruiters.

21%:

How much fixed income revenues shrank by in 2013 compared to the previous year, according to analyst Kian Abouhossein at JPMorgan. The total revenue pool was $44.35bn.

2,188:

The number of investment bankers in London earning over €1m, according to figures from the European Banking Agency. This is by far the largest number of people in Europe earning this figure – there are just 117 in France, the closest competitor to London.

56%:

The proportion of investment banking fees from North America, or $40.3bn – the biggest share since 1998.

€1.93m:

The average pay per individual earning over €1m in the UK, according to the EBA.

$4.67m:

The average pay per head for 115 senior staff at Goldman Sachs in London during 2012, according to filings in December 2013. This is up by 77% on the previous year.

3,200:

The number of front office investment banking jobs lost between the third quarter of 2012 and the same period in 2013, according to figures from Coalition. In 2012, 4,300 jobs were cut.

19,500:

Global headcount in the FICC divisions of major investment banks, according to Coalition. This is down from 24,000 in 2010.

12%:

The uplift in bonuses expected to be paid to equities bankers this year, according to executive search firm, the Options Group.

£22k:

The average bonus paid out to first year analysts in London this year.

6-10%:

How much more JPMorgan will be paying its investment bankers this year, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

17,000:

The number of applications for Goldman Sachs’ summer internship programme.

58%:

The proportion of UK-based finance professionals in the UK anticipating an uplift in their bonus this year, according to the eFC bonus expectations survey. In the U.S., this figure is 42%.

Comments (0)

Comments

The comment is under moderation. It will appear shortly.

React

Screen Name

Email

Consult our community guidelines here