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Downton Abbey Envy Alive and Well at Banker Country Homes

A hedge fund manager lives here

A hedge fund manager lives here

As it’s only January and Deutsche Bank is already predicting thousands more banker investment redundancies in 2013, we’d like to draw your attention to a few impressive financial services residences by way of covetous distraction. Notably, they don’t generally belong to bankers: working for a hedge fund is far more lucrative. Deep in the British countryside, the financial services aristocracy owns some impressive country homes.

1. Chilworth Manor, Guildford

Owned by: Graham Wrigley

Graham Wrigley, effective lord of the manor at Chilworth in Surrey, had a long and auspicious career in private equity with Permira Advisors before re-orienting and becoming an adjunct professor at INSEAD business school with a focus on economic development in low income countries. Chilworth Manor was sold in 2005, when it was on the market for an asking price of £3.5m. It features in the Domesday Book and was once owned by the Bishop of Bayeux. It includes 40 acres of parkland, a library and a walled garden, and is only 35 miles from London.

Photographs can be viewed here.

2. Eastbach Court, Bicknor 

Owned by: Crispin Odey

Crispin Odey of Odey Asset Management is one of the UK’s leading and highest performing hedge fund managers. Despite having what he describes as a ‘wastrel’ for a father, Odey has amassed a fortune of  £455m according to the Sunday Times.  Odey has spent a porton of this fortune on Eastbach Court, a large 18th century house in Gloucestershire which was once owned by the Machen family, the main landowners thereabouts in the 1700s. Odey drew attention to Eastbach when he applied for planning permission to build a £150k sandstone chicken coop at the house in September 2012.

You can see an aerial view of Odey’s country residence here.  You can have a look through the main gate here. 

3. Broughton Grange, Oxfordshire

Owned by: Stephen Hester 

Stephen Hester, chief executive of RBS, is also owner of Broughton Grange, a 350 acre estate in Oxfordshire. Described as a ‘Victorian Cotswoldian Villa,’ Broughton Grange is particularly renown for its delightful gardens, which Hester reportedly employs eight full time gardeners to attend to. There is also a large tree house.

You can see photographs of Broughton Grange here and in the links above.

4. Rowler Estate, Croughton, Northhamptonshire

Owned by: Ian Wace

Ian Wace, co-founder of Marshall Wace Asset Management, bought the Rowler Estate in Crowler, Northamptonshire for an alleged £20m in 2006. The estate is said to include a manor house, a private lake, a commercial farm, a trout farm, stables, a water-bottling plant and other facilities, as well as its own abattoir and a bowling alley disguised as a fake medieval tower.

You can see a photograph of the Rowler Estate here. 

5. Testbourne Estate, Longparish, Hampshire

Owned by: Tim Tacchi 

Tim Tacchi, the low profile founding partner of global macro fund TT International, owns considerable swathes of land around the village of Longparish in Hampshire. This includes Testbourne House, an equestrian centre. Tacchi bought much of the farmland associated with the Longparish estate before 2007 and then built a new (large) home on the previous Testbourne House, equipped with underground swimming pool.

Unfortunately, there are no photographs.

Comments (2)

Comments
  1. This article is rubbish honestly!….if they own these lands then good for them…I am sure they worked hard for it! everyone gets what he/she deserves

  2. Honestly Booba, you are what your name suggests. Who do you know does not work hard for a living and are they, all the rest of them, entitled to such massive estates. You fail to understand that the rest of us are suffering under a massive financial crisis produced by the very same businesses this article is exposing the individuals behind. WAKE UP.

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